White Spot Z [ID: 27]

Coordinates : 37.134° latitude , 276.48° longitude
Submitted by : EthanChappel on 2015-12-20 02:36 UT

Most storms in the North Equatorial Belt usually last a year or so before dissipating. However, White Spot Z has persisted in this area since 1997. We should take a look at it to see if there's something unique about White Spot Z or if its long lifespan is just a fluke.

map : 2015-12-14 UT
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11 Comments

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  1. comment by Tambov-10 on 2020-08-10 00:27 UT

    Looks pretty wild, I think it has to be something else with such a long lifespan. I have no idea but I hope they find out!

  2. comment by Minor-71 on 2020-06-06 05:08 UT

    There has to be something neat out here. Did the Hubble telescope not find a vast unknown word where we only saw darkness. Might we not find the same conclusion from this smudge.

  3. comment by Brilawrence-02 on 2020-06-01 20:12 UT

    This dot looks very similar to those that are in the lower hemisphere, I wonder if there is any coloration between the two.

  4. comment by Stanchiang-24 on 2020-05-29 04:27 UT

    All of the dots look very similar meaning that they have to be something that has so sort of function on the planet in my eyes

  5. comment by Rainbow-Dash on 2020-03-24 14:58 UT

    It might be like "Red Spot Jr." Or it could be like The Great Red Spot :) :) :) :) :) :)

  6. comment by Brynnium on 2019-11-06 21:43 UT

    What interests me most of all about this feature is both the persistence and the color. Color changes with composition, which changes with depth, and I wonder how composition and latitude affect persistence in the spots.

  7. comment by Brynnium on 2019-11-06 21:40 UT

    It would indeed be valuable to understand why and how some features persist in Jupiter's atmosphere. I am curious to know how features further from the equator are affected compared to equatorial features.

  8. comment by Philosophia-47 on 2017-01-19 01:05 UT

    These latitudes are currently very disrupted from both the NTBs upheaval and new outbreaks of white ‘rifts’ (convective storms) in the NEB. Although white spot Z itself may be out of view at Perijove-4, the whole region is interesting: Can JunoCam show where the turbulence is spreading from?

  9. comment by Tucholsky-32 on 2016-08-03 15:23 UT

    I agree with Brookebowers-08, also the spot is on the boundary between zone and belt and should reveal interesting results.

  10. comment by Sanford-18 on 2016-07-06 04:54 UT

    I've loved science when I saw it on tv as a child with my dad & always will be intrigued by it. Thanks to NASA & Teachers .

  11. comment by Labs-93 on 2016-07-03 17:30 UT

    I agree. The lifespan of this storm has to be one most interesting features on the gas giant.